Hindu folk festival | Charak Puja 

 

A devotee sways hanging from a bamboo pole, a ritual performed during Charak Puja festival on the last day of the Bengali calendar in Old Dhaka on 13 April, 2016 . It is a festival of penance dedicated to the Hindu God Shiva. © Monirul Alam
 
Charak Puja also known as Nil Puja is a Hindu folk festival held in southern Banhladesh and West Bengal on the last day of the month of Chaitra in Bengali calender called Choitro. 

People believe that the festival will carry prosperity by eliminating the sorrow and sufferings of the previous year. The festival is actually a festival to satisfy Load Shiva, the great Debadideb of Hindu Religion. Though the festival takes place on the mid night of Chaitra Songkranti, the preparation phase usually starts before one month of the day. In Bangladesh, it is frequently found to take place at Thakurgaon, Patuakkhali,Gazipur, Dhaka and other district in villages and cities.  

Though the festival takes place on the mid night of Chaitra Songkranti, the preparation phase usually starts before one month of the day. The arrangement team of the festival go from village to village to procure the necessary components like paddy, oil, sugar, salt, honey, money and other items with the arranged cosmetics such as Shiva, Parvati and Narod.On midnight of the Songkranti, the worshippers are gathered together to worship the God and after puja the or asad is distributed.

A devotee sways hanging from a bamboo pole, a ritual performed during Charak Puja festival on the last day of the Bengali calendar in Old Dhaka on 13 April, 2016 . It is a festival of penance dedicated to the Hindu God Shiva. © Monirul Alam

 

A devotee sways hanging from a bamboo pole, a ritual performed during Charak Puja festival on the last day of the Bengali calendar in Old Dhaka on 13 April, 2016 . It is a festival of penance dedicated to the Hindu God Shiva. © Monirul Alam
 
 
A devotee sways hanging from a bamboo pole, a ritual performed during Charak Puja festival on the last day of the Bengali calendar in Old Dhaka on 13 April, 2016 . It is a festival of penance dedicated to the Hindu God Shiva. © Monirul Alam
 

Art is a lie that tells the truth . . . 

The summit’s aim was to address complex social, political and personal issues through a trans-regional narrative that aims to illuminate how the different nation-states, and the multiplicity of identities, languages and religions that it holds, exchanges and interacts with one another and the wider world. Diana Campbell Betancourt Chief Curator, Dhaka Art Summit February, 2016 


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The Dhaka Art Summit, produced by the Samdani Art Foundation, began on February 5, 2016 at the Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy. The exhibition ran on till February 8, 2016 and attracted a staggeringly impressive number of viewers, patrons and participants.
The summit was planning to showcase the work of about 300 artists and scholars who are either originally from or have worked very closely with the South Asian region, and on top of that the platform was to evolve from an exhibit of art to a space of research and exploration of not only art but the very real philosophical conundrums that are gripping the world today through written and spoken words and through film.

Paush Shankranti | Old Dhaka Festival

Bangladeshi young people celebrate a Paush Shankranti in their roof top at old part of Dhaka, Every year on 14 January people celebrate it with joy of happiness.The Paush Shankranti’ is the last day of Bengali month Paush. The day is also known as ‘Makar Sangkranti’ it’s celebrate like India, Nepal and Bangladesh. In Bangladesh, young people of the old Dhaka celebrate Shakhrine with colorful kite flying during the day and than fire eating or blowing performances after dark with fireworks,music cracker works. also arranged. 

 The kite fighting gets all the more serious in the afternoon. Even the oldest members of the family join the youth. Meanwhile, different kinds of rice cakes, deserts and confections are made for the occasion. The festival is basically an event of joy, happiness and friendship. The scenes of Shakrain demonstrate the canvas of brotherhood and cheerfulness of old Dhaka dwellers.

According to the solar calendar, on the last day of the Bengali month – ‘Poush’, the sun moves towards its southward (Dakshinayana) journey at the Tropic of Capricorn and starts moving towards the Tropic of Cancer. The day is known as ‘Poush Sangkranti’, also ‘Makar Sangkranti’ all over the world. The day is celebrated by the Hindu community. In Bangladesh, it is more or less celebrated by the people of all religions especially in young community. The festival has been celebrating in here since Mughal period. Perhaps, the history is more primitive. January,2016, Old Dhaka, Bangladesh © Monirul Alam
 

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